Succulents 🌵



We're back with more potted plant love, this time shining the light on these 11 succulents. See our last post on Houseplants for 17 more plants to love on.

Echeveria 'Topsy Turvy'

Hen and Chicks

Sempervivum tectorum

If you have a hard time remembering to water your houseplant, succulents may be for you. Hen and Chicks is one of the most popular of the Sempervivum genus, and needs very little water. It can grow in a range of light conditions from part shade to full sun.


📸Photo credit: thespruce.com


Echeveria 'Topsy Turvy'


Topsy Turvy Echeveria

Echeveria runyonii 'Topsy Turvy'

A popular succulent, this can grow in a range of light conditions from part shade to full sun if outdoors; inside, it should be next to the brightest window. It needs very little water and should have soil that drains really well.


📸Photo credit: reddit.com



Mother of Thousands

Mother of Thousands

Kalanchoe daigremontiana

An extremely prolific plant hailing from Madagascar, be mindful of the nearby pots because the babies grow from the mother's arms and will propagate easily where they fall. It prefers warm, dry placement and has stunning but rare blooms. It's also toxic to small pets and babies if digested.


📸Photo credit: amazon.com


Kalanchoe

Kalanchoe

Kalanchoe blossfeldiana

This Madagascar native will bloom throughout the year, as long as it gets sunlight. Succulents tend to be drought-tolerant, so make sure it has well draining soil or a cactus potting mix. Also like most succulents, it will propagate through cuttings. Don't let the misnomer "gift plant" fool you. In the past, these were given as a live bouquet then thrown out! Watch out for your furry friends as this is toxic to cats and dogs.


📸Photo credit: veldkampsflowers.com


Aloe Vera

Aloe Vera

Aloe barbadensis Miller

Got a sunburn? Cut your finger? Yikes! You need an aloe vera leaf handy! An easy-to-care-for succulent with medicinal properties is great to have around. You just need to cut a small portion of the fleshy leaf and it will self-seal for when you need to harvest a little more. This stemless little guy doesn't like full sun, so it is a good option for shadier outdoor beds or in pots around the house. Just make sure it has good drainage and a hole at the bottom of the pot, and only water if the soil is very dry. There are a lot of different kinds!


📸Photo credit: interiorplants.ca

Crown of Thorns

Crown of Thorns

Euphorbia milii

Also from Madagascar, this plant is heat tolerant and drought resistant, but should be protected from freezes. It likes full sun for best display of flowers throughout the year. It was named for the depiction of Jesus' thorny crown. The example photo is of a very mature specimen, which can grow into a shrub, but works as a houseplant for many years. Don't overwater and give it well-draining soil, but it's a forgiving plant as long as you don't leave it in a hard freeze.


📸Photo credit: Jan Norton



Pencil Cactus

Pencil Cactus

Euphorbia tirucalli

Pencil cactus is actually a succulent and not a true cactus. In addition to "pencil cactus," is commonly known as aveloz, Indian tree spurge, naked lady, pencil tree, and milk bush. It likes a warm, dry environment as it's native to Africa and India. Give it full sun and protect from freezes. They can propagate from cuttings: after the milky sap dries, place in soil and water sparingly. Be careful with the sap, though, as it can cause irritation to the skin and eyes, and is considered toxic to people and animals and can cause temporary blindess.


📸Photo credit: interiorpros.wordpress.com


Red African Milk Tree

Red African Milk Tree

Euphorbia Trigona

This easy to propagate, bright sun-loving succulent likes to dry out between waterings. It's less likely to bloom indoor than many of its friends but you might catch a yellow or white flowering during spring/summer. Keep this plant in a south-facing window, if possible, and repot it every three years. Its sap is toxic so be sure to keep this plant away from those that might pick at it or ingest it; use gloves when propagating and wash away any sap as soon as possible.


📸Photo credit: ebay.com



string of pearls


String of Pearls

Senecio rowleyanus

This trailing plant is perfect for a hanging pot to showcase its pearl-like specialized leaves that are about the size and shape of small peas. The odd shape of the leaves allow for storage of water, much like all succulents. It can be grown indoors or outdoors but be mindful to keep it in above freezing temperatures. Like the ornamental and dramatic look of this plant? Be sure to check out string of dolphins, too! Keep out of mouths as it is somewhat poisonous and should not be consumed.


📸Photo credit: kestrelshop.com


Christmas Cactus

Christmas Cactus

Schlumbergera bridgesii

Flattened stems divided into segments give this very popular Brazilian epiphyte a unique and unusual look. As the name suggests, it blooms bright pink/crimson flowers from the tips of the stems during winter that last for quite some time. They prefer a humid condition which can be achieved with using a pebble tray below the well-draining soil base. Keep this tropical plant out of direct sunlight, cold drafts, and freezing conditions. Great news with this one: it is non-toxic to dogs, cats!


📸Photo credit: thespruce.com


Jade Plant

Jade Plant

Crassula ovata

Coming in last on our list, but arguably one of the most well-known common succulents, is the jade plant. This plant is very low maintenance and can be propagated quite easily by simply placing a leaf on top of soil, in fact, many dropped leaves can sprout their own new pups! While somewhat rare to see it flower, these jades may produce small white or pink star-shaped flowers in the winter if kept in the right conditions. The jade plant is susceptible to over watering which can cause root rot so keep your H₂0 in check. This plant is toxic horses, dogs, cats, and mildly toxic to humans as well.


📸Photo credit: indiagardeneing.com









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